Meek Mill-Championships (Album Review)

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cham·pi·on
/ˈCHampēən/
noun
  1. a person who has defeated or surpassed all rivals in a competition.
    synonyms: winnertitleholder, defending champion, gold medalist, titlistrecord holder.

    2. a person who fights or argues for a cause or on behalf of someone else
    synonyms: advocateproponentpromotersupporterdefender, upholder, backerexponent.

    When I think of the word “Champion” these are the definitions that first come to my mind. When this word is applied to Meek Mill and his latest offering “Championships” you can see how both definitions could apply. We as a Hip-Hop community have watched Meek grow in a literal and figurative sense. From “Dreams and Nightmares”, his stellar “DreamChasers” series and 2017’s “Wins and Losses”, Meek’s fourth solo effort seems to be a triumphant reflection of ALL of those experiences since 2011 when the first DreamChaser was released.

    By this time, if you don’t expect “The Intro” of any Meek Mill album to be something that is almost indescribable, then there is no reason to read this review any further honestly. The album begins with a haunting Phil Collins sample which is now synonymous with Hip-Hop because DMX used it 20 years earlier on his debut. It was a nice nod from Meek and I feel that it was definitely for the Hop-Hop historians out there. Awesome opener.

    “Trauma” doubles down on the homage. It’s instantly recognizable as Mobb Deep’s “Get Away” which is ALSO the second track on their “Infamy” album. I don’t believe that was coincidental in the slightest. Meek takes the track in a different direction however as he raps about the trappings of prison ,the oft-corrupt judicial system and how that can affect your psyche when living in the inner-city or densely populated areas.

    The third track “Uptown Vibes”  is so contrasting in tone that is takes me out of the album almost immediately, its a decent enough track as its a uptempo and bouncy SINGLE, but with such heavy topic matter from the previous two tracks it just feels out of place to me, the first misstep of the album.

    “On Me” keeps with the same energy as Uptown, its pretty forgetful though even with the Cardi B verse which is the honestly the only highlight of that track. Don’t feel bad if you feel the urge to skip this one its ok.

    “What’s Free” sends us back to the mood and feeling of the first two tracks and at this point I’m beginning to get annoyed. What album is this really? Are we sitting with this album and being reflective or are we turning up and celebrating? Don’t get me wrong we can do both because Balance but it has to be sequenced correctly. Meek continues with the sample homage as he, Ross and Jay-Z all takes turns tearing the “What’s Beef” track to shreds so whatever reservations I may have had about the early sequencing of the album has subsided for now.

    “Respect The Game” relies heavily on the essence of  “Dead Presidents II” which I also believe was by design considering Jay was on the previous track. When you listen to the track you can hear that Meek was really doing an updated version of the original and no one can be mad at that. I’m back on board now.

    Just as I was getting immersed into the album again, I’m taken out of it when “Splash Warning” starts. I’m normally here for all things Future but as this track follows two damn near perfect tracks, it pales in comparison and should have been paired with Uptown Vibes and On Me, not sandwiched in between The previous tracks and “Championships” which is so soulful that I’m actually upset that Splash Warning was even included.

    “Going Bad” IS NOT the reunion track from Meek and Drake that I wanted.  Meek sounded uninspired with the lazy flow and Drake outshines him period. I feel like Drake should have took more of  risk lyrically and let us in on some more personal dealings if he was on the previous track.

    “Almost Slipped” is cringe-worthy at best. Meek’s vocal tone is not suited for Auto-Tune and the entire track is drenched in the effect. Simply put it’s not sonically cohesive.

    “Tic Tac Toe” is a much better song by comparison. Subject matter is much to be desired but for better or worse its a banger…Generic…but a banger nonetheless. Kodak was sorely underused on the track, he deserved a verse. The type of track is better suited for Gunna or Lil Baby.

    “24/7” is a groove or as the kids say, a Bop. The production is crisp with the Beyonce vocal samples from “Me, Myself And I” weaved into the beat. The track is damn near perfection, with the addition of Ella Mai, this is a definite push for radio play and playlist placements, Here’s hoping Jacqueeeeeees doesn’t do a remix.

    “Oodles O’ Noodles Babies” brings it back to the original mood and tone of the album which bothers me. The songs that precede it don’t mesh with this song and should have been placed with the upper half of the album. The sequencing issues are apparently here to stay.

    “Pay You Back” feels like a bonus track, I can honestly say that I don’t know where this song fits anywhere on the albums spectrum. The tone goes from reflection to unapologetic braggadocio and I don’t see any room for “Hard Bars”.

    “100 Summers” is better use of Auto-Tune but its still a hard listen. The subject matter is relatable as it deals with loss, regrets, and survivors remorse. It’s the vulnerable aspect of the track that makes its listenable but that’t about it.

    “Wit The Shits” is a forgettable strip club anthem, I’m sure its serving a particular section of listeners but it’s just not for me and I’m okay with that.

    “Stuck In My Ways” is another Bonus Track addition, Although it fits the theme of all the songs with this similar tone on this album, it just comes off and repetitive and unoriginal especially when “Dangerous” is just as repetitive and could easily replace any of the aforementioned tracks.

    “Cold Hearted II”- Is the album’s closer and at this point I’m upset.  The previous three songs do not fit with this track. The content contained here is poignant and real and I’m left feeling hollow. This track could have easily followed Oodles O’ Noodles Babies and would have wrapped up the album nicely.

     

    This is a tale of two albums. There are certain tracks and belong together while others seem so out of place that as whole its comes off as disjointed. Depending on your preference there are 10 songs that are undeniable while the other 9 are serviceable but wont do much to warrant a “Classic” rating.  With this being his fourth album I can see the glimpses of growth but not enough to call it a re-brand or image overhaul. It is the same Meek Mill with some socially conscious and contemplative verses. The sequencing and overall bloated feel of the entire project is what hold it back for me. A more concise effort with none of the filler would made this a much more enjoyable listen. Maybe DreamChasers 5 will be the album I’m waiting to hear.

 

Final Grade-C+

 

 

 

It’s Dark And DMX….

ITS DARK AND DMX

 

They say when you’re a child, everything and everyone is larger than life. Every person or character is viewed as a being of mythic proportion, a superhero if you will. When you’re a child your imagination is in it’s purest state of freedom. Life at the time is vibrant and kaleidoscope-like. Music, whichever genre you gravitate towards, is the soundtrack to those vibrant, kaleidoscopic visions.  May 12th, 1998 offered a jarring contrast to what an 11-year-old boy originally understood about music, colors and though still in its infancy…life.

I was already an avid Hip-Hop fan by the time I was introduced to DMX’s music. We as a community were still reeling from the untimely deaths of  2Pac and The Notorious B.I.G. so needless to say there was a power vacuum taking place in mainstream hip-hop. Who was going to grab the torch from BOTH of these instant legends? That question was lingering throughout all of Rap and seemingly out of nowhere I began hearing a gravelly voiced MC from Yonkers bellowing out to anyone that dared to crossed his path to “STAY OUT THE DARK!”

The song of note was LL Cool J’s “4,3,2,1” and I couldn’t get enough of it. I believe X’s verse at the time was probably the fastest I had ever knew a verse front to back, It had to be a matter of days. After that song was digested, another track was called “Pull It” featuring Cam’ron quickly filled the void for the contributions I craved. The music was dark, the feel was gritty and the tone was bleak. It seemed like even though the world was still grieving, X  was not about to offer recompense. It was HIS time and he was taking it.

 

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There was a different vibe in the air during the Spring of 1998. Before his first single dropped, we already had the a good sample size of what X  had to offer and what he was bringing the table. Aside from “4,3,2,1” and “Pull It” we also had “Money, Power, Respect” and 24 Hours To Live”. These core four set the stage for what was soon to some with DMX’s Debut album “It’s Dark and Hell Is Hot”.  Armed with arguably one of the most street lead singles ever in Hip-Hop history, “Get At Me Dog” shot through the game like Super Dave being blasted out of a cannon.

I knew there was something different about the landscape at the time, I was not the only one captivated by his music and his energy. Imagine being in a middle school science class, when your teacher inexplicably leaves the room, then out of nowhere the entire class erupts in unison, chanting the chorus from “Ruff Ryders Anthem”. Or being at Boy Scout Camp and trying to play basketball with your much more athletic friends, so you go sit on the bench , become a mascot and press play on the radio. A team that was down 7 was magically up by 10, I guess that’s just how Ruff Ryders roll.

 

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By the time Woodstock ’99 came around, there was only two other times in my young life where I had seen one person captivate a virtual sea of people with just their presence. The first one was a clip of Freddie Mercury absolutely destroying Live Aid, the volume  seemed endless and overwhelming, but Freddie seemed unfazed and continued to dazzle the concert goers. The second was Michael Jackson’s ” Live In Bucharest: The Dangerous Tour” in 1992. Again the amount of people affected by MJ’s effortless moves were simply awe inspiring. After seeing those two Megastars achieve those feats, to see someone from the Hip-Hop realm do it as well was truly something that only few will be able to do. The “IT” factor was on full display with DMX.

 

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“Its Dark and Hell is Hot” was such an impactful album, that many could not understand why it did not reach the pinnacle of success that it should have. It’s eventual Grammy snub was in fact the impetus for Jay-Z boycotting the ceremony for years. Jay-Z ladies and gentleman. HOV. Jiggaman. The God MC himself said that because of the committee’s refusal to acknowledge a true work of art, he would not partake in any festivities. This was 1998 Jay…not the 4:44 Jay…let that sink in.

Looking back on how well this album has aged in the 20 years that it has been here for consumption, I STILL find myself picking up new jewels and nuggets of wisdom within much of the content. As a kid I didn’t fully understand the hurt, the pain, the anguish that plagued him throughout much of his life.  I was not aware of the mental health issues that he shared with us on many of the tracks. Paranoia,  Manic Depression, Bi-Polar Disorder, and in some instances schizophrenia were all elements that were weaved throughout the project.  What sounded like entertainment then is now viewed as a soul bearing plea for help in the present day.

It was the honesty, authenticity, and brass tacks lyricism that captivated a young 11/12 year old kid from Orange, New Jersey. It figuratively and literally changed the way I heard music from that point on. The rawness of it all, the dystopian outlook aged me in ways I wasn’t aware of until much later in my adult life. Hearing this album made realize that 1998 was more than just another watershed moment in Hip-Hop. It let me know that this genre was tailored specifically for me, something to cherish, uphold and protect. At a time in where much of what was given was saccharin sweet to say the least, The guttural bellows of the gravelly voiced MC from Yonkers let me know that there would forever be a place in music, in art,and in life for something real. Earl “DMX” Simmons…..Legend.

 

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J Dilla’s Lasting Legacy

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James Dewitt Yancey was born on February 7th 1974.  What he was able to achieve in terms of musical progression in the 32 years that he was allotted on this earth was quite simply amazing. From original compositions and remixes in the mid to late 90’s to jaw dropping, mind-boggling soundscapes of the early 00’s, Dilla’s penchant for pushing boundaries is that something that is still lauded and awe-inspiring to this day, even 12 years after his death.

As as a youngster discovering sounds and more importantly Hip-Hop for the first time, I was introduced to J Dilla’s work long before I knew who he was. Listening to the likes of A Tribe Called Quest, The Pharcyde, Busta Rhymes, Erykah Badu, The Roots and D’Angelo I had no idea that many of the songs that I loved from these artists were in fact produced by him. It wasn’t until early in my college career that I discovered the man behind many of the songs that I deemed classics. If it wasn’t for “J.J.” I seriously doubt that I would have made those connections when I did, so for that I’m forever grateful.

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Once that light bulb went on however, I did my Due DILLAgence and began searching, scouring the net,  the brick and mortar stores and iTunes at the time for all things Jay Dee related. From there I really got into Madlib and Nujabes, the former is one who I strongly consider to be a direct contemporary. It was no coincidence that right after I had that thought, I came across “Champion Sound” which was sadly Jaylib’s lone collaborative project. It is a technical marvel in terms of sound and is rightfully considered an underground classic.

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Slum Village-Fan-Tas-Tic Vol.1

Slum Village was another important pickup for me while I was “digging” so to speak. “Fan-tas-tic Vol. 1” was the one that I gravitated toward, falling in love with the minimalist approach to crafting songs. “Welcome To Detroit” was yet another album that I have a ton of respect for. For me it sounded like more of what I was accustomed to in terms of the Slum sound and was a great addition to an already stellar catalog.  While listening to Slum Village, I was introduced to Elzhi and Black Milk.

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Khrysis and Elzhi are “Jericho Jackscon”

Even though most of Elzhi’s work was on subsequent Slum Village albums after Jay Dee’s departure from the group, there was still a bevy of material to sift through with Elzhi tearing apart Dilla Beats.  “Villa Manifesto” was the last time all four members of Slum Village were featured on a single project…Rest In Peace Baatin.  Even with the album pictured above that was released on February 23rd, 2018 the legacy lives on with Elzhi sounding as sharp as ever while Khrysis crafts beats that are reminiscent of  Dilla’s early work.

 

 

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Karriem Riggins- Headnod Suite

When “Headnod Suite” dropped on February 24th 2017, I declared then that if  J Dilla were alive today and dropped “Donuts 2”, It would sound exactly like this. From the chopped up loops, to abrupt breaks or “perfect mistakes” as I call them, It is abundantly clear that Mr. Riggins  has studied the techniques very closely and has arguably perfected the sound altogether. It’s also no coincidence that Karriem Riggins was entrusted with completing “The Shining” which was unfortunately only 75% completed at the time of Dilla’s passing.

 

Black Milk Fever
Black Milk-Fever

As mentioned earlier, while listening to Slum Village I discovered Black Milk while reading through the liner notes. Determined not to make the same mistake I did with J Dilla, I immediately bought “Popular Demand” and was blown away.  Any album that he has dropped since Dilla has passed has felt like he picked up the mantle of pushing boundaries musically. Every album sounds and feels different sonically.  The “Fever” album also dropped on February 23rd, 2018 and I implore all of you to go give this album a spin, you will not be disappointed.

 

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In ending, The words above summarizes my senitments on J Dilla entirely, to quote Black Thought’s heart-felt and soul stirring voicemail from the song “Can’t Stop This” he states:

“My man, JD, was a true hip hop artist
… I can’t explain the influence that
His mind and ear have had on my band
Myself and the careers of so many other
Artists.
 The most humble, modest, worthy

And gifted beatmaker I’ve known. And
Definitely the best producer on the mic
Never without that signature smile and head
Bouncin’ to the beat.
 JD had a passion for

Life and music, and will never be forgotten
He’s a brother that was loved by me, and I
Love what he’s done for us. And though I’m
Happy he’s no longer in the pain he’d been
Recently feelin’, I’m crushed by the pain of
His absence.
 Name’s Dilla Dog and I can only
Rep the real and raw.
 My man, Dilla, rest in

Peace.”

As I sit here 12 years after J Dilla’s passing, I can’t help but wonder where he would have taken music had he still been with us. What new technique would he have invented that would have changed the landscape entirely. J Dilla did indeed change my life, he changed the way I heard and understood music. He made me study music theory just so I could have a better appreciation of 3 second sample from an obscure record placed at an unconventional section that would normally destroy the structure of a song. A practice that if done by anybody else during that time, I’m not sure that it would have been executed with such precision. James Dewitt Yancey was born on February 7th 1974.  He was truly a one of one the likes of which we will most likely never see again…Maybe in our next lifetime.

The RapNerd’s Lament…

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“A Sad Man” by Javi Velazquez

 

As a life long fan of Hip-Hop, I find myself at a point where I’m extremely conflicted. Although my love for the art form has not wavered, I have begun to question much of the content and intent that has pervaded the mass consciousness of general music listeners. The more I listen, the more I absorb, the more I begin to realize a harsh truth. A truth that many will often defend to the point of being obnoxious, ignorant, selfish or just flat-out wrong. The truth is that we as a Hip-Hop Community hates women, Women in general but Black Women specifically.

On The Diplomats song “Once Upon A Time” Cam’Ron rapped:

“Welcome back to the hallway loiterers
I made mills off the white girl, I exploited her
No disrespecting the ladies, word from my team (why)
That’s the reason Dame smacked Harvey Weinstein.”

By now we should all know about the monster that is Harvey Weinstein and he deserves every punishment that can be given to him. While what Cam rapped about was something commendable on Dame’s behalf, I couldn’t help but think about all the times I went crazy every time “Wet Wipes” or  “Suck It Or Not” was played back in 2007. In 2018 I looked back on those songs began to cringe profusely.  I began to wonder how many men in their early 20’s 10 years ago feel the same way now as I do. As the conversation shifts ever so violently toward women’s rights. I found myself pondering what role if any does Hip-Hop play in the sphere of Misogynoir.

For those of you that don’t know, Misogynoir is defined as; misogyny directed towards black women where race and gender both play roles in bias. To break that down further, Misogyny is defined as; the hatred of, contempt for, or prejudice against women or girls.  Now when you take those definitions and apply them to the current landscape of Mainstream Hip-Hop (the most listened to genre of music in the world at the present day) There is a very serious issue that stands before us. How many times have we as fans been complicit in the systemic tearing down of black women?

Through the music we have allowed ourselves to fall victim to the politics of respectability. The medium of music videos has done more to marginalize black women. Entire social media and terrestrial media platforms have been created to further drive home that point. So much so, that we as consumers believe that any woman who is apart of these platforms is of low moral standing. We as a community has allowed this to happen.

Another branch of the misogynior tree is rape culture. To make it plain and simple, anytime a woman is forced, or coerced into sex without her consent is rape period. In a world where words or phrases like “thot”, “scrapes”, “stabs”, and “hoes” have become normal jargon, it can blind you to the fact that women, Black women are the targets of these words more times than not. When Rick Ross rapped:

“Put Molly all in her champagne, she ain’t even know it
I took her home and I enjoyed that, she ain’t even know it
Got a hundred acres I live on, you ain’t even know it
Got a hundred rounds in this AR, you ain’t even know it
Got a bag of bitches I play with, on cloud 9 in my spaceship”

he knowingly shared his tactics with us on how he beds women,and all we did was nod along and ran the song back.

There are varying degrees to which we as black men have been complicit with notions and concepts that are less than becoming or savory. Degrees that none of us are exempt from. As I sit here and continue to ponder, I ask myself, where did much is this originate from? On Kid Cudi’s song , “Make Her Say(Poke Her Face)” A song literally about receiving oral pleasure, Conscious Stalwart Common once implored women to “get their hair right and get up on this conscious dick”.  In that verse he answers a poignant question, while “Embodying everything from the Godly to the party” when he finally spit, “that’s the way I was raised in this Southside safari so….” That led me to believe that this has been passed down through generations as misogynoir normally is.

In ending, as I continue this mental exercise, I’m finding myself more confused than when I began. Where is the balance? How do I continue down this path of musical freedom while also being aware that Black Women continue to be marginalized? It’s literally coming from all sides. How do we raise this generation of young girls and boys? when is it the right time to expose them to the art form? While it is beautiful at its core, there is a bunch of muck that surrounds it. Muck that is profitable, Muck that is vibrationally frequent , Muck that is universal.

When 300 Took Over….

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The year was 2012, the month was March and to me it was a normal day. I went to work and instead of working, I would normally talk rap with a few of my coworkers. The normal back and forth about what’s hot, what’s not, and who is up next. This one day in particular was different because for the first time, I was one of the people who was being put on to something new. My coworker “JB” told me about this young kid from Chicago that had the streets on lock and I should check him out. Now of course I was completely flabbergasted because I didn’t know who the kid was, so my response was “Word?!, Nah gotta check him out for myself and get back to you tomorrow, whats his name again?” A look of frustration came over JB’s face because he couldn’t remember his name. Then about 10 minutes later he screamed out “BACK FROM THE DEAD!”, “That’s the name of the mixtape, you can find it on DatPiff or just look for it on YouTube, you’ll see what I’m talking about.”

Needless to say that ringing endorsement was all I needed to get me excited about the prospect of  new young artist that appeared to be taking the rap underground by storm. I rushed off the clock at work, turned my phone one and went straight to YouTube to get the full introduction. As soon as I typed in “Back From The Dead” I was blown away by the amount of views this kid and his crew had already amassed. An entire column of videos with astounding numbers for the time, They were already viral. No video had less than one million views with hundreds of comments. The kid was Chief Keef and the Crew was 300 or GBE as I would soon come to understand in the following weeks.

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The most popular video that I viewed at that time was Chief Keef’s  “I Don’t Like” and It was gaining in popularity. admittedly I was resistant because as a 25/26-year-old, all I saw was a young kid and not taking time to see what kind of impact he and the crew would go on to have. When I got home from work later that night, I continued my research and began to learn the names of  the crew members and many of the names that were shout out in the song. Aside from the track’s lone feature that was Lil Reese, the other names that I learned were…Lil Durk, SD, Tadoe and Fredo Santana.  It was something abrasive but appealing to the music, alarming but authentic. No it wasn’t the train wreck that some tried to make it out to be, but it was indeed a symptom of the socioeconomic issues that plagued many of our inner cities.

As the weeks and months went by, I began to notice something remarkable.  I began to see kids from my hometown and the surrounding areas of Northern New Jersey emulate the other kids they saw on the internet from the mid-west. The slang, hand gestures, clothing, and even musical styles starting bubbling from my state. At first I was taken aback and became angry because I felt that we needed to carve out our own identity musically and mimicking another region would prove detrimental. The longer I looked though, I soon realized that it wasn’t just my state of  New Jersey, but states like New York, Connecticut, various states in the south and the west were all doing the same thing. The influence of GBE was sweeping the country.

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Everywhere I looked and listened I saw kids all grouped together screaming “Gang” or “Squad”  along with the corresponding hand sign to differentiate the terms. Every neighborhood became a block named after someone who may have passed away or it may have become their “world” so to speak. Words like “Clout”, “Opps”, and “Savage” can all be directly attributed to the Glory Boyz. Others phrases like “In The Cut” and “Glo Up”  also became a apart of the American lexicon. Even in the present day, you would be hard pressed to find a single person that doesn’t refer to anyone that is overzealous in any arena as a “thot”.

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Unfortunately, much of this retrospection comes on the heels of the untimely death of  Derrick Coleman other wise known as Fredo Santana. throughout this weekend, I saw the love pour in from many of the same places that he helped to influence. In a world where hot takes and hyperbole have become the new normal, somehow Fredo being labeled as a legend does not seem out-of-place. The truth of the matter is that for him, his family and friends, the label of legend is supremely fitting. Glo In Peace Fredo Santana.

KayFabe and Hip-Hop

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In professional wrestling, kayfabe /ˈkeɪfeɪb/ is the portrayal of staged events within the industry as “real” or “true”, specifically the portrayal of competition, rivalries, and relationships between participants as being genuine and not of a staged or predetermined nature of any kind. Doesn’t that sound familiar? Doesn’t that sound like something that is enjoyed by billions throughout the globe? Yes my friends, I am talking about The Sports Entertainment world known as Hip-Hop. While the culture and essence of Hip-Hop is still very much intact, The advent of “beef for profit’ has been something that  many of the labels have sought after since the first Hip-Hop record was sold.

When Hip-Hop was in its infancy in the late 70’s and Early 80’s, the life blood of the art form was based widely on competition and crew rivalries(Factions). During that time battles took place within the boroughs to see who could lay claim to the proverbial throne. As Hip-Hop fought for acceptance and viability, it wouldn’t be long before labels came calling, seeking to cash in on what would later on become known as manufactured beef.

Much like Wrestling, Hip-Hop is littered with “BabyFaces” and “Heels”.  As early as the 80’s you had your “Face Rappers” like Will Smith and Young MC while “Heel Rappers” could be seen as Ice T and NWA. While the face rappers were radio friendly and safe for mainstream ears, It was the heel rappers that gave Rap its edge and street cred during that time. It was cool to root for NWO and DX…oops I meant NWA and Public Enemy.

On the T.I. track “Tell’em I Said That” he rapped:

Please pay attention to this part of the bull
One time got robbed got shot got shook
Got a job started rhymin’ came up with a hook
Got a chain and some tats came up with a look
Went and made it here
Workin’ talk tough in a book
F*** the image and perception they never tough as they look

This quote from the album “T.I. vs. T.I.P” succinctly describes the current era of  Hip-Hop. The “Image” is what the label heads are trying to sell the consumer on a daily basis as it churns out act after act. In true Kayfabe fashion, many of the artists don’t bother to separate fiction from reality instead they straddle the line. “Am I really this mega rich, doped up superstar?, Or am I just a actor?” Now some may view this as pure conjecture but to the impressionable, try telling them that wrestling…err..um..Rap is fake.

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When the Drake and Meek beef took place, both artists positioned and postured themselves with a story line that seemed like it was ripped straight from the WWE writer room. While Drake used the Titantron…Shucks I meant the OVOFest screen to get at Meek, Meek cut instagram promos like a true mid carder trying to get over and make it to the main roster. Was it good clean fun for those few days that it occurred, sure but how many of us really believed that any kind of real harm would come to either one of them during this spat.

 

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The Lil Wayne and Birdman situation is something I would liken to the “Montreal Screw Job”. Vince McMahon has been billed as a true heel in the industry and the way he treats his artists….I’m sorry I mean wrestlers… is something that is akin to Birdman. Weezy to me is The Brett Hart of the Rap game and was forced to put other rappers over while his own product suffered.

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2017 gave us another WWE like feud…and it even included microphones being tossed on the floor! Again it was mindless fun like an episode of  Raw or Smackdown but for some reason many of us thought there was a legitimate threat of  a real altercation. No Such luck, just more comedic fodder to create memes and music.

In Ending, there is much to love about about both mediums. Both have their merits and adversely both are not without flaw. The gangsters are hyper gangsters while the more gentle rappers are damn near priests on the mic. As the veil of mystery and secrecy has all but dissolved between artist and consumer, it seems to me that the Rap Kayfabe machine has gone into overdrive. We create hashtags out of catchphrases, we walk around in our favorite wrestlers (there I go again) rappers merch, and throw up their gang signs in our pictures. To be clear there is absolutely nothing wrong with having a good time connecting with our favorite artist but we must always remember to take a step back and see it for what it truly is…..Music Entertainment.

 

 

 

The 18 For 2018: The Antcipated

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2018 is looking like it’s shaping up to be another one for the record books. 2017 was an awesome year musically, but it felt like something was missing. I can’t fully place my finger on it but when compared to years like 2015 or 2012, there was a significant dip. 2018 to me feels like there will be much more of a balance and we’ll get stellar releases from Vets and Rookies alike…Below are 18 of the drops I’m looking forward to. Here’s to a most fire 2018!!!

 

1. Nipsey Hussle-Victory Lap

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Finalllllly!…..Nipsey is dropping arguably his most anticipated album of his career. I say arguably because this is literally HIS FIRST ALBUM of his career. Although he has given us a slew of stellar mixtapes and projects…This looks like it will shape up to be a most fitting end to the marathon.

 

2. Lupe Fiasco- DROGAS Wave

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2017’s Drogas Light  yielded mixed reviews from the supremely talented lyricist.  Admittedly he said that the release was purposefully “light” and that the follow up would be a lot more dense and would be what Lupe stalwarts have grown accustomed to. Either way you look at, I viewed Drogas Light as the warm-up and I’m expecting Drogas Wave to exceed expectations…Possible album of the year.

 

3.  Maxo Kream- Punken

 

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If  I was Dr. Jeykll, Maxo Kream would without a doubt be Mr. Hyde. I have often referred to him as my Rap Doppelganger.  Since 2013’s QuiccStrikes I’ve been down with the Kream Klicc so to speak and each release has gotten better.  Expect this album to rattle trunks sooner than later.

 

4. Black Panther: The Album 

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Marvel’s Black Panther has already been forecast as 2018’s First Blockbuster, making well over $100 Million dollars opening weekend. In Recent news, Kendrick Lamar and TDE have been pegged to curate/helm the soundtrack. Based on the sound of the first single “All The Stars” Black Panther will be a moment…An Epic Moment…I  Cannot Wait!

 

 

5. PRHYME- PRHYME 2

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DJ Premier and Royce Da 5’9 are PRHYME. When their eponymous debut came out in 2014, It literally took the year by storm and it was highly ranked in many year end lists. Its been a long 4 years since then so hopefully we’ll get this project sooner than later.

 

6. Travis Scott-Astroworld

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I am here for anything La Flame decides to give…Even the Huncho Jack offering with Quavo has grown on me. So with that being said…Astroworld is the place where The Birds in the trap sing McKnight.

 

7. Drake-TBD

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On Drake’s Playlist “More Life” he said “he’d be back in 2018 to give us the summary”.  Welp, who knows how far into 2018 we will get until we get a proper Drake album…Here’s hoping he comes back with and drops a classic.

 

8.  Judas Priest- Firepower

 

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I must admit I cackled when I saw this purposed cover art for the the forthcoming Judas Priest album…It does give me that feel of 80’s hair metal and that’s something I’m definitely here for. Don’t be surprised if you see me around town in full air guitar mode. It’s bound to happen so you’ve been warned.

 

9. BrockHampton- Team Effort

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After their breakout monster year, Hip-Hop’s first(?) boy band BrockHampton will drop their 4th album in a years time. Team Effort will look to further solidify the group as a true force in Music and satiate their ever growing rabid fan base.

 

10.  Jack White-Boarding House Reach

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Whew its been Four years since Jack White released Lazoretto…but I’m proud to say that the wait is now over. I’m honestly not sure what to expect from this upcoming album so that by itself has me intrigued.

 

11. Elzhi/Khrysis- Jericho Jackson

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2018 will also see the continuing trend of One MC/One Producer led projects. Khrysis who is fresh off his Grammy Nods for his work on Laila’s Wisdom will jump back behind the boards to give underrated wordsmith Elzhi some top notch beats to lace time and time again…Another early contender for Album of the Year.

 

12. Gucci Mane- Evil Genius

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There is no slowing down for La Flare. Fresh off of a normal year which saw 3 releases, Gucci Mane has already announced another album for 2018. I know I’m speaking for myself but I really enjoyed El Gato and I would not mind getting another offering from Guwop without any features.

 

13.  Kid Cudi-TBD

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Hey!, Mr. Raaager, Mr.Rager
Tell me where you’re going, tell us where you’re headed”

The rumor mills are churning with speculation that Kid Cudi and Kanye West are working on a album together. I don’t know about you but an entire project with Cudder and Kanye is going to be a must listen whenever it drops.

 

14. Lil Wayne-Dedication 6: Reloaded

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Dedication 6 showed flashes of the brilliance that still exist within Wayne and still gives me hope that his title of Greatest Rapper Alive remains. “Family Feud”  only further bolstered that notion for me and only brought up my anticipation factor to astronomical levels. If I get at least 10 “freestyles” like Family Feud, I’ll be more than comfortable saying Weezy is back.

 

15.  Cardi B-TBD

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2017 brought Cardi B her first number one song in the country. That momentum should carry her into 2018 with her Debut album that will probably drop late in the first quarter. I’m excited hear the growth and the content to see if she will be a mainstay in the mainstream for years to come.

 

16.  Key!-777DS5Rrv6VMAAbkjI

 

Fatman is back with some new material on the horizon. 2017 saw the release of  Two-9’s album along with frequent collaborations with the A$AP affiliate “AWGE”. It’s great to see Key! get much deserved shine and as of yet, He has not dropped one bad song.

 

17.  A$AP Rocky-TBD

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A$AP Rocky is primed and ready for another solo release.  Its been 3 years since his last solo outing and while it may be have been deemed too artistic for some. It was still lauded as a brilliant addition to his catalog. Look for something epic to drop soon.

 

18. Pusha T- King Push

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This is one of my main question marks for 2018. Along with Tha Carter V, King Push is the now long awaited 2nd LP from Pusha T. If this year comes and goes without this album dropping…I will officially cast it away to DetoxLand…Never to be spoke of again.